Dulcis Infernis

damaged-and-dangerous:

Anubis by *Tatchit
transcending-flesh:

The Irish werewolf is different from the Teutonic or European werewolf, as it is really not a “monster” at all. Unlike its continental cousins, this shapeshifter is the guardian and protector of children, wounded men and lost persons. According to some ancient sources, the Irish werewolves were even recruited by kings in time of war. Known in their native land as the faoladh or conroicht, their predatory behaviour is typical of the common wolf, not beneath the occasional nocturnal raid.

yuppvinny:

cultureincart:

The cute little monk in Xichan Temple, Fuzhou, southeast China’s Fujian Province.

很可爱。

chalkandwater:

Sand mandala at Thikse Monastery, Ladakh, India.

Samsara (2011)

chromedreaming:


 
Know your Vegvisirs. I was drawing these, wondered why the different versions around the place.Nobody can figure out what Björks tattoo actually is, a Galdrabók one roughly done most likely. She got it when she was 17. Interesting what she said about the Vikings.

alyssaaraee:

EVERYONE STOP AND REALIZE!! THIS IS A BABY FOX!!!

minarachelle:

( ☆ ) op We Heart It

last-on-your-lips:

Faith is a heavy and complicated discussion to have with me because I don’t fit under any umbrella of religion and I really disagree with a lot of the Christian beliefs and systems. I’m so used to not having the discussion because religion and faith are things that just don’t usually come up as topics in my family and friend circles. But I was invited to go to church with my mother by her friend.

I don’t go to monotheistic churches or houses of worship because my beliefs and practices are considered sinful and disrespectful by singular god religions. I respect other religions by not stepping in their holy spaces, it’s just so much easier than dealing with the overtly friendly old women that would be welcoming me to their church.

I explained this to the woman that invited me and she nodded and accepted my explanation. She thanked me for not being rude about it too. Of course, ill still be giving her and my mum a ride to church on Sunday.

Anonymous → I've been considering trying out forest walking and you made an interesting point about asking permission. :) I was wondering if there are any specific things I should say when I try it out? I'm a shy little bug but I want to respect the spirits around me the best way possible and if I ask permission I think that is a good place to start.

duskenpath:

I just started doing it because it felt natural, so I would just say something like gods and spirits of the land, my name is x and I ask permission to pass, if this is good send me a sign or something

Sometimes you get words, sometimes the spirits are non-verbal. You really have to be observant. The last spirit I talked to was a large owl and she was very non-verbal, this last spirit had a deep voice but refused to take a shape, saying they were too limiting, and even engaged me in conversation for a while about unicorns (and called me little spirit which was really f cute)

Now mostly other beings tend to recognize me as a non-human, ie unicorn since forest and unicorns are like super tight, so I introduce myself using the moniker I have for that form of myself, not my physical boring old name, u understand

I would use whatever name or nickname is closest to your true form without outright giving your name away if that makes sense

Generally you’ll know if you indeed have permission to pass or not, it’s pretty evident

I’ve never gotten a ‘no’ but I would also imagine respecting the no is equally important since so many humans don’t give a fuck and just plow through wherever they feel like you know

kisstherain1:

THE ANCIENT WORLD: THE MOTHER OF CITIES: (3500 BC):

The first urbanised civilisation was established in the region of southern Mesopotamia (Sumeria). Mesopotamia (meaning the ‘land between the rivers’) remained largely uninhabited until around 5,500 BC when the development of irrigation made it possible for farmers to grow food. By C.4,300 BC small towns were being built. By C. 3,500 BC, the fastest growing town - named Uruk had become the world’s first city.

Each Sumerian region had its own independent government, which was always based in a temple precinct. A city’s ruler was its patron god. The government was led by an en, or a nin, - a priestly figure who acted as the god’s representative on earth.

The Sumerian people remain somewhat of a mystery. They referred to themselves as ‘the black-headed people’. However, their language was not related to any other known language, so their origins are hard to trace. 

brainstuffshow:

Do clocks really follow an ancient Sumerian system? Ben explains Why There Are 60 Minutes In An Hour Instead Of 100.